Introducing
new
xcopri
® (cenobamate tablets) CV
Are you a
US healthcare professional?

Epilepsy Today

Epilepsy is not as controlled as you may think

About 60% of people with epilepsy have partial-onset seizures —
Many adults with epilepsy continue to have seizures1-4

three-million-us-adults-with-epilepsy-statisticThree Million US Adults With Epilepsy Statistic0,000,000US adults

report having active epilepsy,*
according to the CDC1

Nearly

sixty-percent-still-experience-seizures-statistic. Sixty Percent Still Experience Seizures Statistic 00

still experience seizures despite the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs)2

seizure-rates-same-since-1980s-fact Seizure Rates Same Since 1980s Fact Image

despite new AEDs coming to market,

seizure freedom rates have remained Nearly the same3†

When patients are still continuing to have seizures they are5:

6x

more likely to have depression

4x

more likely to have limitations to at least 1 usual activity

4x

more likely to require daily informal assistance

4.5x

more likely to be prevented from driving

3x

more likely to have poor health

3x

more likely to have overall limitations in life

3x

more likely to have limitations in employment or to be unemployed or unable to work

2x

more likely to have limitations in education

2x

more likely to experience stigma

Based on data that compared patients who had ≥1 seizure in the past 5 years with those who experienced no seizures in the past 5 years.

Patients with uncontrolled
seizures have an
increased
risk of SUDEP6‡

*Active epilepsy was defined as having self-reported doctor-diagnosed epilepsy, either under treatment or with seizure activity in the past 12 months.1

Seizure freedom was defined as a patient experiencing no seizures for the previous 12 months or longer.3

Based on data which compared patients who had ≥1 seizure in the previous year with those who had zero seizures.

CDC=Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; SUDEP=sudden unexpected death in epilepsy.

References: 1. Zack MM, Kobau R. National and state estimates of the numbers of adults and children with active epilepsy—United States, 2015. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017;66(31):821-825. 2. Tian N, Boring M, Kobau R, Zack MM, Croft JB. Active epilepsy and seizure control in adults—United States, 2013 and 2015. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2018;67(15):437-442. 3. Chen Z, Brodie MJ, Liew D, Kwan P. Treatment outcomes in patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy treated with established and new antiepileptic drugs: a 30-year longitudinal cohort study. JAMA Neurol. 2018;75(3):279-286. 4. Hauser WA, Annegers JF, Kurland LT. Prevalence of epilepsy in Rochester, Minnesota: 1940–1980. Epilepsia. 1991;32(4):429-445. 5. Josephson CB, Patten SB, Bulloch A, et al. The impact of seizures on epilepsy outcomes: a national, community-based survey. Epilepsia. 2017;58(5):764-771. 6. Nilsson L, Farahmand BY, Persson P-G, Thiblin I, Tomson T. Risk factors for sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: a case-control study. Lancet. 1999;353(9156):888-893.

Important safety
information

Contraindications

XCOPRI® (cenobamate tablets) CV is contraindicated in any patients with known hypersensitivity to the compound... or any of the components of the drug product.

XCOPRI is contraindicated in patients with Familial Short QT syndrome.

For US Healthcare Professionals Only

Important safety information

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION and INDICATION for XCOPRI® (cenobamate tablets) CV

CONTRAINDICATIONS

XCOPRI is contraindicated in any patients with known hypersensitivity to the compound or any of the components of the drug product.

XCOPRI is contraindicated in patients with Familial Short QT syndrome.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS): Also known as Multiorgan hypersensitivity, has been reported in patients taking antiepileptic drugs, including XCOPRI. DRESS has been reported, including one fatality, when XCOPRI is titrated rapidly (weekly or faster titration). No cases of DRESS were reported in an open-label safety study of 1339 partial-onset seizure patients when XCOPRI was initiated at 12.5 mg/day and titrated every two weeks. This finding does not establish that the risk of DRESS is prevented by a slower titration; however, XCOPRI should be initiated at 12.5 mg once daily and titrated every two weeks. DRESS typically, although not exclusively, presents with fever, rash, and/or lymphadenopathy, in association with other organ system involvement. Eosinophilia is often present. If such signs or symptoms are present, the patient should be evaluated immediately. XCOPRI should be discontinued immediately and not restarted if an alternative etiology for the signs or symptoms cannot be established.

QT Shortening: XCOPRI can cause shortening of the QT interval. Caution should be used when administering XCOPRI and other drugs that shorten the QT interval as there may be a synergistic effect on the QT interval that would increase the QT shortening risk.

Suicidal Behavior and Ideation: Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), including XCOPRI, increase the risk of suicidal thoughts or behavior in patients taking these drugs for any indication. Patients treated with any AED for any indication should be monitored for the emergence or worsening of depression, suicidal thoughts or behavior, and/or any unusual changes in mood or behavior. Advise patients, their caregivers, and/or families to be alert for these behavioral changes and report them immediately to a healthcare provider.

Neurological Adverse Reactions: XCOPRI causes dose‐dependent increases in the neurologic adverse reactions including, dizziness, diplopia, disturbance in gait and coordination, somnolence, and fatigue.

Prescribers should advise patients against engaging in hazardous activities requiring mental alertness, such as operating motor vehicles or dangerous machinery, until the effect of XCOPRI is known.

Withdrawal of AEDs: As with all antiepileptic drugs, XCOPRI should generally be withdrawn gradually because of the risk of increased seizure frequency and status epilepticus. But if withdrawal is needed because of a serious adverse event, rapid discontinuation can be considered.

MOST COMMON ADVERSE REACTIONS

In adult adjunctive therapy placebo-controlled clinical studies, the most common adverse reactions that occurred in XCOPRI-treated patients (incidence at least 10% and greater than placebo) were somnolence, dizziness, fatigue, diplopia, headache.

DOSING CONSIDERATIONS

Dosage adjustment of XCOPRI or other concomitant medications may be necessary.

  • Consider gradually reducing phenytoin dosages by up to 50% during initial titration.
  • Consider reducing dosages of phenobarbital and clobazam as needed when used concomitantly with XCOPRI. When XCOPRI and carbamazepine or lamotrigine are taken concomitantly, consider increasing dosages as needed of carbamazepine or lamotrigine.
  • Consider increasing dosages as needed of drugs which are CYP2B6 and CYP3A substrates and decreasing dosages as needed of drugs which are CYP2C19 substrates.
  • Effectiveness of hormonal oral contraceptives may be reduced when administered concomitantly with XCOPRI. Women should use additional or alternative non-hormonal birth control.

Dosage reduction of XCOPRI may be considered in patients with mild to moderate and severe renal impairment. XCOPRI use is not recommended in end-stage renal disease.

The maximum recommended daily dose is 200 mg for patients with mild or moderate hepatic impairment. XCOPRI use is not recommended in patients with severe hepatic impairment

DRUG ABUSE

XCOPRI is a Schedule V controlled substance.

INDICATION

XCOPRI is indicated for the treatment of partial-onset seizures in adult patients.

Please see full Prescribing Information.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION and INDICATION for XCOPRI® (cenobamate tablets) CV

CONTRAINDICATIONS

XCOPRI is contraindicated in any patients with known hypersensitivity to the compound or any of the components of the drug product.

XCOPRI is contraindicated in patients with Familial Short QT syndrome.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS): Also known as Multiorgan hypersensitivity, has been reported in patients taking antiepileptic drugs, including XCOPRI. DRESS has been reported, including one fatality, when XCOPRI is titrated rapidly (weekly or faster titration). No cases of DRESS were reported in an open-label safety study of 1339 partial-onset seizure patients when XCOPRI was initiated at 12.5 mg/day and titrated every two weeks. This finding does not establish that the risk of DRESS is prevented by a slower titration; however, XCOPRI should be initiated at 12.5 mg once daily and titrated every two weeks. DRESS typically, although not exclusively, presents with fever, rash, and/or lymphadenopathy, in association with other organ system involvement. Eosinophilia is often present. If such signs or symptoms are present, the patient should be evaluated immediately. XCOPRI should be discontinued immediately and not restarted if an alternative etiology for the signs or symptoms cannot be established.

QT Shortening: XCOPRI can cause shortening of the QT interval. Caution should be used when administering XCOPRI and other drugs that shorten the QT interval as there may be a synergistic effect on the QT interval that would increase the QT shortening risk.

Suicidal Behavior and Ideation: Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), including XCOPRI, increase the risk of suicidal thoughts or behavior in patients taking these drugs for any indication. Patients treated with any AED for any indication should be monitored for the emergence or worsening of depression, suicidal thoughts or behavior, and/or any unusual changes in mood or behavior. Advise patients, their caregivers, and/or families to be alert for these behavioral changes and report them immediately to a healthcare provider.

Neurological Adverse Reactions: XCOPRI causes dose‐dependent increases in the neurologic adverse reactions including, dizziness, diplopia, disturbance in gait and coordination, somnolence, and fatigue.

Prescribers should advise patients against engaging in hazardous activities requiring mental alertness, such as operating motor vehicles or dangerous machinery, until the effect of XCOPRI is known.

Withdrawal of AEDs: As with all antiepileptic drugs, XCOPRI should generally be withdrawn gradually because of the risk of increased seizure frequency and status epilepticus. But if withdrawal is needed because of a serious adverse event, rapid discontinuation can be considered.

MOST COMMON ADVERSE REACTIONS

In adult adjunctive therapy placebo-controlled clinical studies, the most common adverse reactions that occurred in XCOPRI-treated patients (incidence at least 10% and greater than placebo) were somnolence, dizziness, fatigue, diplopia, headache.

DOSING CONSIDERATIONS

Dosage adjustment of XCOPRI or other concomitant medications may be necessary.

  • Consider gradually reducing phenytoin dosages by up to 50% during initial titration.
  • Consider reducing dosages of phenobarbital and clobazam as needed when used concomitantly with XCOPRI. When XCOPRI and carbamazepine or lamotrigine are taken concomitantly, consider increasing dosages as needed of carbamazepine or lamotrigine.
  • Consider increasing dosages as needed of drugs which are CYP2B6 and CYP3A substrates and decreasing dosages as needed of drugs which are CYP2C19 substrates.
  • Effectiveness of hormonal oral contraceptives may be reduced when administered concomitantly with XCOPRI. Women should use additional or alternative non-hormonal birth control.

Dosage reduction of XCOPRI may be considered in patients with mild to moderate and severe renal impairment. XCOPRI use is not recommended in end-stage renal disease.

The maximum recommended daily dose is 200 mg for patients with mild or moderate hepatic impairment. XCOPRI use is not recommended in patients with severe hepatic impairment

DRUG ABUSE

XCOPRI is a Schedule V controlled substance.

INDICATION

XCOPRI is indicated for the treatment of partial-onset seizures in adult patients.

Please see full Prescribing Information.

For US Healthcare Professionals Only